Saturday, March 22, 2008

Snarky and the Wiffles: Student Samples

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Word and Image 2 students are at work on a project I described recently. Here are two samples of the project from last year, which show shot sequencing and the use of minimal animation to tell the story. Note that the artwork is rough--the problem calls for the creation of 50 to 60 images synchronized to a piece of music with not much time to actually build the art. Both Dmitri (above) and Sarah (below) used sharpies and digital color to bang the images out. The focus is on the communication of a story in a sequential set of pictures in the manner of a film. It's surprisingly hard and frustrating at first, but these examples suggest that clarity and wit are both possible. Since the images go by quickly, our brains are focused on putting the story together, not evaluating the art according to hang-it-on-the-wall standards. Explains how a lot of film trickery works when you get under the hood...

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Projects: Dmitri Jackson, Snarky and the Wiffles, 2007; Sarah Halbert, Snarky and the Wiffles, 2007.

5 comments:

gemini82 said...

I believe you've just described an animatic.

Great use of visual story telling.

DB Dowd said...

Gemini82, yes it is an animatic project. I don't actually call it that, because we try to keep the applied mentality to a minimum at this level. Easier to get to key creative issues that way, for some reason...

gemini82 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
gemini82 said...

I definitely agree. When I think further it really isn't an animatic. Although it has all of the elements, of an animatic, its function isn't to provide further clarity within the process of animation.

It's like calling Chris Marker's La Jetee an animatic. When its purpose is to exist as a self contained film.

Sorry for the long post but your response just gave me an epiphany

P.S. Class sounds interesting.

Bob Flynn said...

Right, an animatic is a production tool. It's used to plan out full animation (or, when you watch it, you're supposed to understand that the animation is coming). These are different, especially because the images come at you in rapid fire. I actually found it a bit disconcerting the first time I watched them through, but on second viewing, they work fairly well. It definitely makes you put together what's happening, so in that regard, I like being an active viewer. Both of them could use a little tweaking here and there, but bravo for a first attempt!