Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Alex Eben Meyer


As a teacher, one of my favorite experiences is the discovery of great work by former students, especially when encountered through the random bounces of consumerdom. Today I opened my copy of the New York Times to discover a great half page illustration by Alex Eben Meyer in the Dining Section. Alex graduated from the Illustration Program at Washington University in the late 90s, when I was transitioning from the Core program, which I'd been hired to lead on my way into the institution. Alex was a student of Jeff Pike's, primarily; I taught a methods studio for seniors in that first year, which methinks was 97-98, and worked with him then. Anyway, I claim no credit, but it sure brightened my day. Thanks, Alex!

3 comments:

alex eben meyer said...

thanks db. for the record, you can take plenty of credit, one of my most valuable lessons from school was to draw from reference. sound obvious, but back in those days we were lazy, just drawing whatever we felt like. then along came a professor who cracked the reference whip, "you don't have to draw what it looks like in real life, but you do have to know what it looks like in real life" (or some such butchering of a quote. it's difficult to remember through all the tears.

DB Dowd said...

Thanks for the note, Alex. The transition from "draw what you see" and the naked people in charcoal to what feels like one's own remains a challenge for all of us. How to find the balance between the authority of the world and the imperative of the maker? We each have our own sweet spot, but it's a behavioral challenge to find it...

alex eben meyer said...

that's a much better way of wording it.